Mexican Asylum Seekers into US Are to Be Returned Back for Asylum Proceedings

law enforcement, News, Politics, SEcurity

The U.S. has reached a deal with the Mexican government to force asylum seekers at its southern border to remain in Mexico while they wait to bring their case before an American immigration judge, a process that could take several months or even years, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced at a congressional hearing on Thursday.

The new policy, effective immediately, is the latest attempt by the Trump administration to curb what it insists are loopholes in the immigration system. Like many of its immigration policies, the plan was likely to face pushback in court.

Nielsen’s announcement before a House Judiciary Committee came as President Donald Trump remained locked in a bitter dispute with lawmakers over whether to shut down the government if he doesn’t get the money he wants to buy a border wall.

PHOTO: A mother migrating from Honduras holds her 1-year-old child after surrendering to U.S. Border Patrol agents for illegally crossing the border near McAllen, Texas, June 25, 2018.
A mother migrating from Honduras holds her 1-year-old child after surrendering to U.S. Border Patrol agents for illegally crossing the border near McAllen, Texas, June 25, 2018.more +

“We have a huge problem with asylum fraud,” Nielsen told the House panel. “We need to work together to combat that.”

Nielsen’s testimony encountered immediate pushback from congressional Democrats who called the plan a misguided attempt to demonize immigrants.

“Is it as (though) you can’t see the realities of modern immigration or the contributions of anyone who came from countries other than Norway or other parts of Europe,” said Rep. Luis Gutiérrez, D-Illinois. “It’s as though you and others in the administration are blind.”

At issue is how the United States decides who should be granted asylum, a right granted to migrants by U.S. and international law. According to the Homeland Security Department, border officials have seen a surge in migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras and that the vast majority are granted entrance into the United States after passing a “credible fear” interview.

DHS said in a statement Thursday that in nearly half of these cases in 2018, the person later failed to appear at a hearing or file an asylum claim, indicating that the person likely opted to remain illegally inside the U.S. As a result, DHS says, only 9 percent of people from those three countries are ultimately granted asylum.

John Cohen, a former acting under secretary at the Homeland Security Department and an ABC News contributor, noted that the law does allow for the federal government, through the attorney general, to deport someone to a “safe third country” pending an asylum claim, if there is bilateral agreement.

But, the law requires that the person’s “life or freedom” not be threatened, and that the person claiming asylum still have “full and fair” access to the U.S. immigration system. That means it’s likely the U.S. will have to devote resources to either bring people into the United States to see an immigration judge, or set up U.S. courts in Mexico — a highly unusual situation that presents legal complications, Cohen said.

“It’s highly probable this will be challenged in court,” Cohen said. “It’ll be up to the courts to determine whether processing someone in Mexico is consistent with the law or not.”

PHOTO: Central American migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the US, line up to borrow a sleeping pad, after arriving at a temporary shelter, set up in a stadium in Mexico City, Nov. 5, 2018.
Central American migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the US, line up to borrow a sleeping pad, after arriving at a temporary shelter, set up in a stadium in Mexico City, Nov. 5, 2018.more +

Administration officials said they expect a dramatic drop in asylum claims if people are not allowed to enter the U.S. and are instead forced to wait in Mexico. Several Republicans on the House committee said they supported the move.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the plan “historic” and said that the Mexican government has promised to give the migrants humanitarian visas to stay on Mexican soil, as well as the ability to apply for work.

“We think that they (migrants seeking asylum) will now see that they can’t disappear inside the United States, and so they will remain in their home countries,” Pompeo told Fox News host Laura Ingraham.

Mexico has previously refused to accept the return of migrants who aren’t Mexican citizens. But earlier this week, the U.S. signed a joint declaration with Mexico promising to invest $5.8 billion in southern Mexico and the three countries where most of the migrants were coming from — El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. The administration also promised a U.S.-Mexico business summit next year and a cabinet-level meeting in January.

The Associated Press reported Thursday that Mexico’s Foreign Relations Department called the latest agreement to allow U.S. asylum seekers to remain in Mexico was a temporary, humanitarian measure)

Trump has been under political pressure from his supporters to take a hard line with immigration. While illegal crossings fell during his first year in office, they have returned to previous levels.

The president’s other executive actions aimed at curbing those crossings at the U.S.-Mexico border have faced setbacks in court. On Wednesday, a federal judge blocked a separate policy that restricts asylum claims of migrants fleeing domestic and gang-related violence. Another federal judge in California issued a nationwide preliminary injunction against a Trump administration rule that made anyone who crosses the southern border outside a port of entry ineligible for asylum.

Trump has expressed frustration in recent days that he hasn’t been able to fulfill his promise to build a border wall.

“When I begrudgingly signed the Omnibus Bill, I was promised the Wall and Border Security by leadership,” Trump tweeted. “Would be done by end of year (NOW). It didn’t happen! We foolishly fight for Border Security for other countries – but not for our beloved U.S.A. Not good!”

ABC News reporters Conor Finnegan and Luke Barr contributed to this report.Sponsored Stories

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Mexican journalist gunned down in Gulf state of Tabasco — peoples trust toronto

News

https://ift.tt/2IkNwlF May 15, 2018 MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – A Mexican journalist was killed on Tuesday in the southern state of Tabasco on the Gulf of Mexico amid deepening violence in one of the world’s most dangerous countries for reporters. Juan Carlos Huerta, a news radio host, was shot dead by armed men as he drove […]

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – A Mexican journalist was killed on Tuesday in the southern state of Tabasco on the Gulf of Mexico amid deepening violence in one of the world’s most dangerous countries for reporters.

Juan Carlos Huerta, a news radio host, was shot dead by armed men as he drove from his home in the state capital of Villahermosa, authorities said. The attackers escaped, officials said.

Huerta had started his own radio station several months ago, two of his colleagues said.

“In the case of Juan Carlos, he was a leading communicator in his field … and I can say it, a friend. I am deeply saddened,” Tabasco state Governor Arturo Nunez told reporters.

Nunez said roads leaving the capital had been closed as part of attempts to catch the perpetrators.

So far this year, at least four journalists from states marred by worsening violence and the presence of criminal gangs have been killed in Mexico. Last year, 12 reporters were killed, according to free-speech advocacy group Article 19.

Article 19 has said Mexico is the most dangerous country in Latin America for journalists, with the number of killings similar to war zones like Syria.

A proliferation of violent criminal gangs drove the number of all murders in 2017 to more than 28,000, the highest in records going back to 1997.

The spike in violence has battered the popularity of President Enrique Pena Nieto and contributed to support of leftist presidential hopeful Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who leads public opinion polls ahead of elections in July.

(Reporting by Lizbeth Diaz; Writing by Michael O’Boyle; editing by Grant McCool)

Vía One America News Network https://ift.tt/2Ijismi

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via Mexican journalist gunned down in Gulf state of Tabasco — peoples trust toronto

Mexico says round-the-world cyclists were murdered 

Crime, News
Krzysztof Chmielewski y Holger HagenbuschImage copyrightCHMIELEWSKI/HAGENBUSCH
Image captionKrzysztof Chmielewski (l) and Holger Hagenbusch had spent years travelling the world on bikes

Mexican investigators say two European cyclists did not die in an accident as first claimed – they were murdered.

The bodies of Holger Hagenbusch, from Germany, and Krzysztof Chmielewski, from Poland, were found at the bottom of a cliff in Chiapas state.

Local authorities had said the pair appeared to have fallen after losing control.

However, relatives and fellow cyclists suspected it was more sinister, and had called for a deeper investigation.

The newly appointed special prosecutor, Luis Alberto Sánchez, said, on Friday, that they were killed in what appears to have been a robbery.

“Our investigations up to now indicate this was an intentional homicide,” he said.

What happened?

Chmielewski’s body was found first, 40 metres below the road, on 26 April.

Hagenbusch was found eight days later – on 4 May – further down the ravine, but beneath the same road that runs between Ocosingo and San Cristóbal de las Casas in the country’s far south.

The regional attorney general in Chiapas, Arturo Pablo Lievano, originally said there was no evidence of bad intent and everything pointed to an accident. He said they may have been run off the road by a vehicle.

However, Hagenbusch’s brother, Reiner, told the German press he believed they had been killed and there had been some sort of attempted cover-up.

After travelling to Mexico to identify his brother’s body, he also found out information about the Polish biker.

“The Polish cyclist was decapitated and had a foot missing,” he wrote on Facebook.

Friends of killed European cyclists Holger Hagenbusch and Krzysztof Chmielewski protest in San Cristobal de las Casas, 6 May 2018Image copyrightEPA
Image caption“Justice for Holger and Krzysztof” – a sign held during a protest in San Cristobal de las Casas last week

Investigators now believe that the pair were assaulted on either the 19 or 20 April.

Chmielewski sustained a head injury that may be a gunshot wound, said Mr Sánchez.

His body was found next to a bike – but it was not his own. It belonged to his German companion, which aroused suspicions.

Talking to BBC Mundo, Mr Sánchez said the assailants were probably trying to cover their tracks. “Those that did this wanted to make it appear like an accident, so they put the bike there, but they made a mistake and used the German’s bike,” he said.

Who were the cyclists?

Krzysztof Chmielewski, 37, was a Polish citizen and had been travelling the world by bike for three years.

He had visited 51 countries and in the last year he had been to Canada and the US, before arriving in Mexico. He was planning to continue south all the way to Argentina, and had almost made it to Guatemala when he was killed.

Holger Hagenbusch, a 43-year-old German, was also an experienced cyclist. He had been to 34 countries and had been travelling by bike for four years, according to his blog.

Un ángel pintado en el camino a OcosingoImage copyrightRAFAEL VILLAGRÁN
Image captionCyclists have painted a cycling angel on the road where the two men were assaulted

The pair had not set out together, but their paths had crossed in Chiapas.

Mr Sánchez told the BBC: “We think that they were travelling short distance from each other, maybe one was assaulted first … and then the second one arrived and they were both captured.”

Map of southern Mexico, showing Chiapas state

He said some of their belongings were missing.

“It was very premature to call this an accident. The bike [belonging to the German] did not show signs of having been in a traffic accident,” he added.

Cyclists pay tribute

On 6 May, people from nearby San Cristóbal de las Casa walked, with their bikes, to kilometre 158 on the highway where the two men were found.

They carried a bicycle that had been painted white – a symbolic gesture used worldwide for cyclists who die while riding – and called for justice for the pair.

Rainer Hagenbusch posted his thanks on Facebook.

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Mexico is struggling to tackle a rising murder rate.

It experienced its most violent year in 2017 with more than 25,000 murders, according to official figures.

It is the highest annual tally since modern records began. Organised crime accounted for nearly three-quarters of those deaths.

14 people killed in 36 hours in Cancun near tourist destinations – Dallas News

international News, Uncategorized

Nine of the deaths took place April 4, making it one of the bloodiest days in Cancun’s history, according to Noticaribe, a news organization based in Quintana Roo. The site reports that 16 people have been killed in Cancun so far this month.     The tropical coastal town, which is perched along the Caribbean Sea in southeastern Mexico, attracts millions of Americans to its warm beaches each year.    The U.S. government issued a travel advisory earlier this year for several popular tourist spots in Mexico, including Cancun — which is known as the spring break capital of the country. The advisory said Americans should “exercise increased caution” because of widespread violent crimes such as homicides,

cacun

14 people killed in 36 hours in Cancun near tourist destinations

One of Mexico’s most popular resort destinations experienced a rash of homicides last week, raising concerns about the safety of tourists in the area.

In the span of 36 hours, officials said, 14 people were killed in Cancun, according to KDFW-TV (Channel 4). Five people were also wounded in the wave of violence that is believed to be related to cartel activity.

The bodies were found near major tourist destinations in the city, the station reports.

Nine of the deaths took place April 4, making it one of the bloodiest days in Cancun’s history, according to Noticaribe, a news organization based in Quintana Roo. The site reports that 16 people have been killed in Cancun so far this month.    

The tropical coastal town, which is perched along the Caribbean Sea in southeastern Mexico, attracts millions of Americans to its warm beaches each year.

The U.S. government issued a travel advisory earlier this year for several popular tourist spots in Mexico, including Cancun — which is known as the spring break capital of the country. The advisory said Americans should “exercise increased caution” because of widespread violent crimes such as homicides, kidnappings and carjackings.

Dallas News.