Why the Most Productive People Don’t Always Make the Best Managers

Business

Why the Most Productive People Don’t Always Make the Best Managers

(Source: hbr.org)

When a company needs a supervisor for a team, senior leaders often anoint the team’s most productive performer. Some of these stars succeed in their new role as manager; many others do not. The difference seems to hinge on whether the person has six abilities: being open to feedback and personal change, supporting others’ development, being open to innovation, communicating well, having good interpersonal skills, and supporting organizational changes. The problem for most organizations is that they hope their new managers will develop these skills after being promoted, but that’s exactly when overwhelmed new managers tend to fall back on their individual contributor skill sets. Instead, start developing these skills in all of your employees early on. After all, they’re useful for individual contributors, too.

apr18-16-200408621-001-Andy-Sacksandy sacks/Getty Images

When a company needs a supervisor for a team, senior leaders often anoint the team’s most productive performer. Some of these stars succeed in their new role as manager; many others do not. And when they fail, they tend to leave the organization, costing the company double: Not only has the team lost its new manager, but it’s also lost the best individual contributor. And the failure can be personally costly for the new manager, causing them to doubt their skills, smarts, and future career path. Everyone loses.

Why, then, do some fail while others succeed?

In another article, we explained the seven behaviors of the most productive people, based on an analysis of 7,000 workers. The behaviors were: setting stretch goals, showing consistency, having knowledge and technical expertise, driving for results, anticipating and solving problems, taking initiative, and being collaborative.

These competencies all leverage individual skills and individual effectiveness. They are valued skills and make people more productive, but all except for the last one (collaboration) focus on the individual rather than the team. When we went back to our data, the skills that our analysis identified as making a great manager are much more other-focused: 

  • Being open to feedback and personal change. A key skill for new managers is the willingness to ask for and act on feedback from others. They seek to be more self-aware. They are on a continuing quest to get better.
  • Supporting others’ development. All leaders, whether they are supervisors or managers, need to be concerned about developing others. While individual contributors can focus on their own development, great managers take pride in helping others learn. They know how to give actionable feedback. 
  • Being open to innovation. The person who focuses on productivity often has found a workable process, and they strive to make that process work as efficiently as possible. Leaders, on the other hand, recognize that innovation often isn’t linear or particularly efficient. An inspiring leader is open to creativity and understands that it can take time.
  • Communicating well. One of the most critical skills for managers is their ability to present their ideas to others in an interesting and engaging manner. A certain amount of communication is required for the highly productive individual contributor, but communication is not the central core of their effectiveness.
  • Having good interpersonal skills. This is a requirement for effective managers. Emotional intelligence has become seen as perhaps the essential leadership skill. Although highly productive individuals are not loners, hermits, or curmudgeons, being highly productive often does not require a person to have excellent interpersonal skills.
  • Supporting organizational changes. While highly productive individuals can be relatively self-centered, leaders and managers must place the organization above themselves.

When we further analyzed our data, we found that many of the most productive individuals were significantly less effective on these skills. Let’s be clear, these were not negatively correlated with productivity; they just didn’t go hand in hand with being highly productive. Some highly productive individuals possessed these traits and behaviors, and having these traits didn’t diminish their productivity.

But this helps explain why some highly productive people go on to be very successful managers and why others don’t. While the best leaders are highly productive people, the most highly productive people don’t always gravitate toward leading others.

Nearly one-quarter (23%) of the leaders who are in the top quartile on productivity are below the top quartile on these six leadership-oriented skills. So, the odds are that one out of four times a person is promoted to a leadership position because of their outstanding productivity, they will end up being a less effective leader than expected. If the highly productive person possesses technical expertise that is specific and acquired over a long period of time, it is tempting to hope the individual will quickly acquire the needed leadership skills shortly after being put into a new role. Sadly, it only happens part of the time.

Managers need to be aware that the skills that make individual contributors effective and highly productive are not the only skills they will need to be effective managers. We are convinced that the best time for individual contributors to be learning these managerial skills is when they are still an individual contributor.

Some organizations are much more adept at identifying those individuals who will be successful managers. These organizations tend to get a jump on developing managerial skill in these high-potential individuals, training them before they’re promoted.

Why start early? After all, most people who end up being ineffective supervisors are not terrible at the skills listed above, and those who recommend them for promotion believe that those skills can be further developed once they’re in a managerial role. The problem is that developing these skills takes time and effort, and organizations typically want to see immediate positive results. New managers tend to be overwhelmed with their new responsibilities and often rely on the skills that made them successful individual contributors, rather than the skills needed to manage others. The time to help high-potential individuals develop these skills is before you promote them, not after.

This should come as a wake-up call to the many organizations that put off any leadership development efforts until someone is promoted to a supervisory position. There’s no reason to wait; after all, when individual contributors improve these leadership skills, they will become more effective individual contributors. The time and money spent investing in individual contributors’ leadership development will help both those who are promoted and those who are not.

The bottom line: Start your leadership development efforts sooner. Then when you promote your best individual contributors, you can be more certain that they’ll become your best managers.

 

More Info: hbr.org

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Five Holidays i Wish We Celebrated in Nigeria —

local news, personality

Hey lovelies! Long time no post. first off, Happy new year everyone and welcome back to the blog. I know it’s been a long while and i’m so sorry for the silence – it’s all been life happening. I literally miss you all and the blog. To everyone who has reached out to me through […]

via Five Holidays i Wish We Celebrated in Nigeria —

Simeone snubs De Gea as he names the best goalkeeper in the world

sports
Simeone snubs De Gea as he names the best goalkeeper in the world

simeone, atletico madrid, saluta, leverkusen, 2016/17

Atletico Madrid boss Diego Simeone talked to media ahead of the Colchoneros’ La Liga clash against Levante and the Argentinean was full of praise for his goalkeeper Jan Oblak: “Jan is the best goalkeeper in the world”, Simeone said.

“Atletico are working to get the best possible players, we want players who can raise the level of the club and I hope Jan will remain with us for long time. He still has a few years left in his contract and every top club have great goalkeepers.”

Diego Simeone’s words left most of football fans stunned as although Oblak is regarded as one of the best goalkeepers in the world, right now Manchester United star David De Gea is probably the best player in his position.

​Oblak, 25, is contracted with Atletico Madrid until 2021 and has a € 100 million release clause included in his contract.

What do you think about Simeone’s words, leave your thoughts in the comment box below.

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Do we really only get a certain number of heartbeats in a lifetime? Here’s what science says

Facts

do-we-really-only-get-a-certain-number-of-heartbeats-in-a-lifetime-heres-what-science-says (1)Do we really only get a certain number of heartbeats in a lifetime? Here’s what science says

“I believe that every human has a finite number of heartbeats,” the famous quote goes. “I don’t intend to waste any of mine running around doing exercises.”

Contrary to what you might have heard, Neil Armstrong never said this. What’s more, he disagreed with it. But as much as it’s a misattribution, was Armstrong right to argue?

The simplest answer is ‘yes’. There is no strict tally for your ticker, keeping track of your pulse until you’ve used up your allocation of beats. So get out and exercise (after you’ve finished reading this article, of course).

But there is a more complex answer, one that suggests there is at least some kind of relationship between our heart rate and overall life expectancy.

In 2013, a team of Danish researchers published in the journal BMJ Heart 16 years of work on just under 5,200 men.

Of the roughly 2,800 individuals who provided a decent bank of medical data, just over a third had passed away by the end of the trial from various causes.

Matching the sample’s resting heart rates with the rate of mortality led the researchers to believe that higher pulses correlated with a greater chance of dying.

Those with between 71 to 80 beats per minute had a 51 percent greater chance of kicking the bucket during that period than those with a resting rate of under 50 beats. At 81 to 90 beats per minute, that risk was double. Over 90, and it tripled.

In case you’re thinking this was all about fitness or risk of cardiovascular disease, they took those factors into account. Even those who were in otherwise good physical condition seemed to be at risk, so once again, don’t use this an excuse to do avoid going for a run.

This sly nod to a relationship between life expectancy and heart rate extends past individual humans – other animals appear to obey a similar ballpark rule.

Check out this website to get some idea of what your pulse is like when compared with, say, a giraffe’s.

As we’ve seen, humans have on average a heart rate of around 60 to 70 beats per minute, give or take. We live roughly 70 or so years, giving us just over 2 billion beats all up.

Chickens have a faster heart rate of about 275 beats per minute, and live only 15 years. On balance, they also have about 2 billion beats.

We seem kind of lucky. A whale has around 20 beats per minute, and lives only slightly longer than us. It gets just under a billion heart beats.

An elephant? Try 30 beats per minute for around 70 years, giving roughly a billion as well.

The poor little skittish hamster has a rapid-fire pulse of 450 beats every minute, squeezed into three short years. That also adds up to a little under a billion.

This rule isn’t a hard and fast one, given differences of a few million here and there.

But if we look at it in rough orders of magnitude, there does seem to be a heart-wrenching link between living fast and dying young for all creatures great and small.

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Between 50 and death.

Facts, Words

Between 50 and death.
olderIt’s time to use the money you saved up. Use it and enjoy it.  Don’t just keep it for those who may have no notion of the sacrifices you made to get it. Warning: This is also a bad time for investments, even if it seems wonderful or fool-proof. They only bring problems and worries. This is a time for you to enjoy some peace and quiet.

Keep a healthy life, without great physical effort. Do moderate exercise (like walking every day), eat well and get your sleep. It’s easy to become sick, and it gets harder to remain healthy. That is why you need to keep yourself in good shape and be aware of your medical and physical needs. Keep in touch with your doctor, do tests even when you’re feeling well. Stay informed.

Don’t stress over the little things. You’ve already overcome so much in your life. You have good memories and bad ones, but the important thing is the present. Don’t let the past drag you down and don’t let the future frighten you. Feel good in the now. Small issues will soon be forgotten. Regardless of age, always keep love alive. Love yourself, your life, love your family, love your neighbor and remember: “A man is not old as long as he has intelligence and affection.” Be proud, both inside and out. Don’t stop going to your hair salon or barber, do your nails, go to the dermatologist and the dentist, keep your perfumes and creams well stocked. When you are well-maintained on the outside, it seeps in, making you feel proud and strong.

Don’t lose sight of fashion trends for your age, but keep your own sense of style. There’s nothing worse than an older person trying to wear the current fashion among youngsters. You’ve developed your own sense of what looks good on you – keep it and be proud of it. It’s part of who you are. ALWAYS stay up-to-date. Read newspapers, watch the news. Go online and read what people are saying. Make sure you have an active email account and try to use some of those social networks. You’ll be surprised what old friends you’ll meet. Respect the younger generation and their opinions. They may not have the same ideals as you, but they are the future, and will take the world in their direction. Give advice, not criticism, and try to remind them that yesterday’s wisdom still applies today.

Never use the phrase: “In my time.” Your time is now. As long as you’re alive, you are part of this time. Some people embrace their golden years, while others become bitter and surly. Life is too short to waste your days on the latter. Spend your time with positive, cheerful people, it’ll rub off on you and your days will seem that much better. Spending your time with bitter people will make you feel older and harder to be around. Don’t abandon your hobbies. If you don’t have any, make new ones. You can travel, hike, cook, read, dance. You can adopt a cat or a dog, grow a kitchen  garden, play cards, checkers, chess, dominoes, golf. Try to go. Get out of the house, meet people you haven’t seen in a while, experience something new (or something old). The important thing is to leave the house from time to time. Go to museums, go walk through a park. Get out there. Speak in courteous tones and try not to complain or criticize too much unless you really need to.

Try to accept situations as they are. Pain and discomfort go hand in hand with getting older. Try not to dwell on them but accept them as a part of the life. If you’ve been offended by someone – forgive them. If you’ve offended someone – apologize. Don’t drag around resentment with you. It only serves to make you sad and bitter. It doesn’t matter who was right. Someone once said: “Holding a grudge is like taking poison and expecting the other person to die.” Don’t take that poison. Forgive, forget and move on with your life. Laugh. Laugh away your worries  Remember, you are one of the lucky ones. You managed to have a life, a long one. Many never get to this age, never get to experience a full life. But you did.

May God be praised
Now is the time to be at peace and as happy as you can be! May you live long and prosper in good health.

Having A Drink A Day? It Could Be Killing You

Facts

drinkingPeople who follow government guidelines to have a drink or so a day could be drinking themselves into an early grave, researchers said Thursday.

 Any more than five drinks a week on average can take years off a person’s life, the new study of more than half a million people around the world shows.

That’s less than what’s recommended in many countries. For instance, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Heart Association both say men can safely drink up to two alcoholic drinks a day and women up to a drink a day.

A drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, four ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof spirits.

An international team of researchers looked at data from 600,000 people in 19 countries, who were asked about drinking habits dating back as long ago as 1964. They were followed for years afterward.

People who reported drinking more had higher rates of stroke, heart disease, deadly high blood pressure and fatal aortic aneurysms, the team reported in the Lancet medical journal.

“The paper estimates a 40-year-old drinking four units a day above the guidelines has roughly two years lower life expectancy,” said David Spiegelhalter, a risk expert at Britain’s University of Cambridge who was not involved in the study.

“This works out at about an hour per day. So it’s as if each unit above guidelines is taking, on average, about 15 minutes of life, about the same as a cigarette. Of course it’s up to individuals whether they think this is worthwhile.”

The most people can get away with and not raise their risk of early death was about five glasses of wine a week or the equivalent, the researchers found.

 Many people can drink far more than that in a single day. The CDC says more than 38 million American adults admit to binge-drinking once a week and guzzle an average of eight drinks per spree.

The CDC says that more than 2,000 Americans die each year from acute alcohol intoxication.

It’s no secret that alcohol can be bad for health in other ways, too. Drinking raises the risk of both cancer and heart disease, and one study suggested that drinking accounts for 15 percent of breast cancer cases.

The risk starts rising with as little as one drink a day on average.

 The American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund recommend in a joint reportthat people limit alcohol.

People who do not drink at all can have worse health, also — something that can confuse consumers and doctors alike. So the researchers, led by Cambridge University’s Dr. Angela Wood, used only information about people who were current drinkers “because ex-drinkers include people who might have abstained from alcohol owing to poor health itself, as well as those who have changed their habits to achieve a healthier lifestyle,” they wrote.

They found that the more people drank, the higher their risk of death compared with people who drank less.

If a 40-year-old man dropped his intake from two drinks a day to around five drinks a week, he could expect to add an average of a year or two to his life, the researchers projected.

What’s the safest drink? It might be wine, sipped a little at a time, the study suggested.

 “Exploratory analyses suggested that drinkers of beer or spirits, as well as binge drinkers, had the highest risk for all-cause mortality,” the researchers wrote.

“The key message of this research for public health is that, if you already drink alcohol, drinking less may help you live longer and lower your risk of several cardiovascular conditions,” Wood said in a statement.

“We should always remember that alcohol guidelines should act as a limit, not a target, and try to drink well below this threshold,” said Victoria Taylor, a senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation.

The study’s likely to be controversial, said Jason Connor and Wayne Hall of the University of Queensland Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research in Australia.

 “The drinking levels recommended in this study will no doubt be described as implausible and impracticable by the alcohol industry and other opponents of public health warnings on alcohol,” they wrote in a commentary.

“Nonetheless, the findings ought to be widely disseminated and they should provoke informed public and professional debate.”

Inflation declines; the biggest drop in 11 months

2019 Elections, Africa, economy, International Finance, local news

Organic-ProduceData made available by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) shows that inflation has again slowed; this time by 0.99 percent points which is the biggest drop in 11 months.

In the Consumer Price Index and Inflation Report for March 2018, the NBS said inflation rate has dropped in 13.34 percent from 14.33 percent in February.

This is the 14th consecutive month of disinflation since February 2017 when inflation first slowed.

The highest increases were recorded in fruits and vegetables, fish, coffee, eggs and cereals.

“On a month-on-month basis, the headline index increased by 0.84 percent in March 2018, up by 0.05 percent points from the rate recorded in February,” the report read.

“The composite food index rose by 16.08 percent (year on year) in March 2018, down from the rate recorded in February (17.59 percent).

“The urban inflation rate eased by 13.75 percent (year-on-year) in March 2018 from 14.76 percent recorded in February, while the rural inflation rate also eased by 12.99 percent in March 2018 from 13.96 percent in February.

“In March 2018, all items inflation on a year on year basis was highest in Bauchi (16.38%), Kebbi (16.36%) and Nasarawa (16.33%), while Kwara (10.30%), Kogi (10.87%) and Delta (11.17%) recorded the slowest rise in headline year on year inflation.

“In March 2018, food inflation on a year on year basis was highest in Nasarawa (20.83%), Bayelsa (19.03%)and Yobe (18.93%), while Kogi (11.99%), Bauchi (12.60%) and Benue (13.07%) recorded the slowest rise in food inflation.”

Inflation had doubled in January 2017 after the economy slipped into a recession in 2016. With consistent disinflation, the economy exited recession mid-2017.

NBS

100 Shades of Ufuoma McDermott!

Africa, Fashion, personality

100 Shades of Ufuoma McDermott! Movie Star celebrates Wedding Anniversary with New Photos

Nigerian actor and former model Ufuoma McDermott celebrated her 8th wedding anniversary to husband Steven McDermott yesterday. The couple got married in 2010 and have two lovely kids, Kesiena Alize and Isio Jared.

ufuoma23.jpg
To mark the anniversary, Ufuoma McDermott had a photo session shot by Ebenezer Dada which she tagged #100ShadesOfUfuoma.
She captioned a photo with

ufuoma

Today is my official #WeddingAnniversary
This day 8 years ago, my husband and I, together with a few friends signed the dotted lines at the Ikoyi registry.
8 years gone. 80 more to go

 

ufo

2018/2019 Trending Ankara tops By Emem Jacks

Africa, Fashion

Ankara Tops

Trending Ankara tops on jeans for ladies.

Ankara prints is definitely the trending fashion now. Ankara blouses on jeans fashion is undoubtedly one of the most popular fashion. Beautiful Ankara top goes well on jeans, do if you are a lover of Ankara and jeans, this article is definitely for you.

Looking back at those time when the only thing you can make from Ankara was buba, but  now you can make out any style with Ankara and look very good in it.

Why jeans?

Demin jeans are probably the most fashionable piece of clothing out there which is extremely adored by everyone, both male and female. Jeans can make you look casual, elegant, eye catching or rebellious. Depending on what you want and if you can combine it with the right top.

Jeans can match literally every piece of clothing ranging from tuxedos, blouses, formal wear or t-shirts. Besides jeans is cheaper compared to other piece of clothing. 

There is a modern trend in not only Nigeria but Africa to combine Ankara tops with jeans which looks very refreshing, compelling, alluring and also bright. Since Ankara prints is very colourful and bright. 

One of the styles is the peblon top, which is absolutely gorgeous and makes a befitting cooperate wear when combined with the right accessories.

These Ankara tops are simply breath taking especially when combined with the right outfit, which in this case is jeans. No matter what you wear you will literally have everyone stunned in your Anna print. Ankara is another celebrity signature look, so if you are pinning to look like your favorite celebrity I suggest you go for Ankara print and find the right style to suit your body figure, height and complexion. So, I hope you find the right Ankara print style that suits you. There are more Ankara print tops below;

BBNaija Housemate- Nina Chinonso Onyenobi

BBNaija, Big Brother Naija, Uncategorized

nina.png

Nina Chinonso Onyenobi is a graduate of English and Literary Studies. Nina is also into modelling, acting and beauty. She also contested for Miss IMSU in 2015. Chi is in an open relationship with Collinz Onyex.

Birth

Chinonso was born in May 31, 1995 in Owerri North, Imo State. She is the last daughter in a family of 5.

Education

Nina is a graduate of Imo State University, Owerri. She studied English and Literary Studies and graduated in 2017. Also, Nina claims fluency in four languages.

Hobbies / Career

Nina is a talented designer, as well as model and actress. Meanwhile, She contested in 2015 for IMSU Most Beautiful Face. However, she lost the crown to Sandra Joseph.

Big Brother Naija

Nina of course made it to the Big Brother House 2018. However, she was pictured kissing Miracle  in the bathroom.

She was asked a few questions, and here is how she answered below.

What will you be bringing into the BB House: I will be bringing my acting talent
What will you do with the prize money: I’ll pay my tithe, help my family and invest in business.
Finally, what irritates you most in other people: When people are proud and lying

2019 elections: Mass defection looms in APC

2019 Elections, Africa, local news, personality, PMB, Politics

SarakiAs reactions continue to trail Monday’s declaration by President Muhammadu Buhari that he would seek re-election in the 2019 general elections, there are indications that some chieftains of the All Progressives Congress (APC) would dump the ruling party ahead of the polls.

The looming defection, New Telegraph learnt, is because the President’s confirmation of his second term bid has foreclosed the ambitions of some APC chieftains also eyeing the party’s presidential ticket.

A party source, who disclosed this to our correspondent, said the presidential hopefuls, mostly outgoing governors of northern extraction and top ranking federal lawmakers, have to look elsewhere to realise their respective ambitions.

New Telegraph, April 12, 2018

Africa must steer the rules of the international financial sector

Business, International Finance, international News, World Bank
Although tax evasion is illegal and tax avoidance isn’t, both erode sustainable development in Africa.

The release of the Paradise Papers last year and the Panama Papers in 2016 revealed the role tax havens play in facilitating tax avoidance, tax evasion and illicit financial flows. The Panama Papers showed dealings associated with tax evasion and illicit dealings, while the transactions uncovered by the Paradise Papers involved largely tax avoidance.

Both flows negatively affect sustainable development in Africa, but tax evasion tends to generate a bigger response than tax avoidance, and subsequently provokes stronger political will to crack down on tax havens. Understanding the differences between tax evasion and avoidance, their influence in Africa and whether they qualify as illicit financial flows is essential when developing effective responses. Both are attempts by an individual or corporation to pay fewer taxes – but while tax evasion is illegal, tax avoidance isn’t.

In practice, the distinction between the terms is not always clear. The Inter-Agency Task Force on Financing for Development describes tax-avoidance practices as existing in a grey area that exploits differences in legal standards across countries, weak legal systems in some countries and different interpretations and acceptance of norms on international taxation. Whether these practices qualify as illicit financial flows is complicated.

There is general agreement that tax avoidance practices are the financial side of criminal activity and efforts to define them contain common elements, but many definitions still exist. One that has increasingly gained traction is ‘cross-border transactions of money illegally earned, transferred or used’. Of particular relevance to the leaks of the Paradise and Panama Papers is determining whether the flows are illicit, which takes into account both the legality and the legitimacy of the flow.

As tax evasion is illegal while tax avoidance is legal, focusing only on legality could undermine the application and effectiveness of international efforts to combat the problem. Determining what constitutes illicit financial flows also depends on the legislation of a particular state, due to differences in legal frameworks.

So international mechanisms designed to tackle tax-related illicit financial flows can be impaired by differences in national legislation, as well as a lack of capacity or willingness to enforce the laws.

Assessments that judge the legitimacy of a flow take into account factors such as rules, customs and fairness. It is widely considered legitimate for an individual to avoid paying taxes, but illegitimate for an individual to evade paying taxes. This distinction is important for determining whether an action is classified as tax avoidance or evasion. Thus, as illustrated by the World Bank, tax evasion is considered an illicit financial flow while tax avoidance is not.

Illicit financial flows fuel criminal economies, contribute to violence, perpetuate existing inequalities, subvert government institutions and undermine the integrity of legal and financial systems. They have even inhibited achieving some of the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals in sub-Saharan Africa. Tax avoidance and evasion reduce the funds available for sustainable development in Africa.

But beyond monetary losses their consequences are even more serious. While both thwart Africa’s development, flows that are classified as tax evasion – and thus illicit financial flows – generate much more swift and tough international responses. Specifically this shapes the perception and treatment of tax havens.

One problem in developing cohesive international frameworks for cracking down on tax havens is contrasting views about the value and threat of tax havens. This includes tensions between stakeholders from developed, northern nations and those from developing southern countries.

Some argue that tax havens might have a positive effect on the global economy, facilitating greater global investment and allowing firms and individuals opportunities for tax avoidance to sidestep poorly designed tax systems. But evidence increasingly shows that these ‘treasure islands’ help facilitate crime and drain Africa’s resources.

The African Network of Centres for Investigative Reporting showed that African actors and illicit financial flows figuredprominently in the Panama Papers. This is problematic for Africa, as northern counterparts tend to have a stronger voice and greater leverage in the creation and enforcement of laws and regulations governing the financial sector. No African nations are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and only South Africa belongs to more than one of six influential international financial institutions.

Also, when the OECD and the G20 designed the Common Reporting Standard – a standard for information exchange and the basis for bilateral agreements between states – they did so without meaningful consultation of low-income states.

The result, the Financial Transparency Coalition explains, is ‘a system designed by wealthy nations, with wealthy nations in mind, making many of the prerequisites impossible for countries that don’t have sizable tax administration budgets or advanced technical capacity’. Also, some wealthy countries choose to share information predominantly or exclusively with other wealthy countries.

Various responses are needed to combat tax avoidance, tax evasion and illicit financial flows more broadly – but increasing the contribution of African states in international financial institutions is essential. Africa must have a voice within international financial institutions to ensure that regulations, policies and responses reflect African priorities. This will help ensure that priority is given to the flows that most negatively affect sustainable development.

Without this participation, Africa’s relationship with tax havens will continue to be one of pain and no gain.

Marcena Hunter, Senior Research Analyst, Global Initiative against Transnational Organised Crime

Is Côte d’Ivoire becoming a wildlife trafficking hotspot?

Corruption, Facts, Politics, World Bank
coteTackling corruption is a priority in stopping the spread of this damaging transnational organised crime.

Since 2016, Côte d’Ivoire has recorded at least five major wildlife-trafficking events involving seizures and arrests. The most recent was in January, when 578kg of ivory and over half a ton of pangolin scales, leopard skins and other items were seized. According to media reports, the pangolin scales were probably poached and harvested in Côte d’Ivoire, while the elephant tusks came from West, East and Central Africa.

These seizures and arrests were the result of multiple investigations aimed at dismantling networks of wildlife traffickers. The investigations are being carried out by Côte d’Ivoire’s Transnational Organised Crime Unit and the Ministry of Environment, Water and Forests with assistance from the Eco Activists for Governance and Law Enforcement (EAGLE Network) – a non-governmental organisation that fights wildlife trafficking.

Based on available information, the problem in Côte d’Ivoire seems smaller in scale than in other countries in the region (such as Nigeria or Guinea) or elsewhere on the continent, such as East and southern Africa. But recent seizures may only represent the tip of the iceberg, and could provide a long-overdue glimpse into both the crime and the networks that run it. Continued investigations will undoubtedly allow a better understanding of the phenomenon.

According to reports, pangolin scales and elephant ivory are the most trafficked wildlife products in the country. These products come from Côte d’Ivoire and other countries in the region, such as Burkina Faso, Guinea, Mali, Nigeria and Liberia, and are believed to be destined for Asian markets. This makes Côte d’Ivoire both a country of origin and of transit. 

Although poaching has long since been recorded in Côte d’Ivoire, the country has only recently been flagged for wildlife trafficking activities. A TRAFFIC report published in December 2017, which presents data on pangolin seizures and trafficking routes between 2010 and 2015, makes little reference to Côte d’Ivoire. The main states that feature in West Africa are Nigeria, Guinea and Liberia. This highlights the need for more information on the scope and scale of wildlife trafficking in Côte d’Ivoire.

The main challenge is preventing the country from becoming a trafficking hub. Several internal factors make the country particularly vulnerable.

For a long time, the government has failed to prioritise conservation and anti-wildlife trafficking measures. The forest police and other bodies tasked with managing, preserving and protecting wildlife lack human, financial and material resources. Those involved in the illegal trade of protected species receive relatively light penalties, limited to a fine of 3 000 to 300 000 CFA francs (between €4.57 and €457), and two to 12 months in jail. There is little indication that authorities are planning a tougher stance which might be a grave oversight, given that wildlife crime is likely to grow.

Corruption generally enables organised crime. The EAGLE Network says some level of corruption among public officials is recorded in 85% of arrests of alleged traffickers. Trafficking in protected species is considered lucrative, and the corruption it breeds undermines the integrity of governance systems, including security and justice, and fuels the business of trafficking.

Wildlife trafficking is also related to other forms of trafficking and transnational organised crime. At the mass seizure in January, some of those arrested were found with evidence that could be linked to human trafficking, illicit arms, drug trafficking and money laundering. Unless action is taken fast against wildlife trafficking, criminal networks will widen their footprint in Côte d’Ivoire, compounding organised crime and corruption in the country and beyond.

To tackle the problem, Côte d’Ivoire’s government must acknowledge that wildlife trafficking is a form of transnational organised crime with potentially dire consequences for the country. A first step should be the toughening of existing legislation. United Nations Resolution 71/326, adopted in September 2017, calls on states to make ‘illicit trafficking in protected species of wild fauna and flora a serious crime’.

To prevent criminal networks from deepening their presence and impact in the country, Ivorian police and justice officials must step up investigations and increase monitoring and surveillance. This requires upskilling and raising the awareness of security forces – including water and forestry agents, police and customs. To dismantle transnational networks, cooperation between the police, intelligence and judicial authorities of affected countries must be strengthened.

Most important of all however in the fight against wildlife trafficking, is tackling corruption in the management and protection of fauna resources.

William Assanvo, ENACT Regional Coordinator West Africa, ISS

This article was first published by the ENACT project.

Picture: © WWF Global Photo Network/Flickr

Israel’s Violent Response to Nonviolent Protests

international News, Military, Terrorism, War

israel1Israel’s Violent Response to Nonviolent Protests

Yasser Murtaja was a self-taught photojournalist who reported on his community and had the distinction of doing camerawork for a documentary by Ai Weiwei, the Chinese dissident and artist.

Normally, that wouldn’t be a life-threatening career. But Mr. Murtaja, 30 years old and the father of a 15-month-old son, lived in Gaza, the enclave of nearly two million Palestinians ruled by ruthless Hamas militants that has been devastated by an 11-year blockade by Israel and Egypt and three wars between Israel and Hamas that have killed thousands of Palestinians and about 100 Israelis.

On Friday, Mr. Murtaja was shot and killed by Israeli security forces whilecovering protests that over the past two weeks have drawn tens of thousands of Palestinians to Gaza’s border with Israel, demanding to return to lands their families lost in the 1948 war that accompanied Israel’s founding.

At times, some of the younger protesters have moved close to the border’s no-go zone, burning tires and throwing rocks at the fence. Israel has said some Gazans have tried to toss crude explosives, shoot weapons and breach the barrier.

But in general, the protests have been peaceful, with many demonstrators staying far back from the heavily fortified fence to picnic and hold a tent camp sit-in. There has been no apparent reason for Israel to use live ammunition.

The government claims that the protests are a cover for a more violent Hamas agenda, including encouraging Gazans to penetrate the fence and push into Israel. Israel has a right to defend its border, but in the face of unarmed civilians it could do so with nonlethal tactics common to law enforcement, such as the use of high-powered fire hoses.

Since the protests began, Israeli forces have killed at least 29 Palestinians and wounded more than 1,000. On the day Mr. Murtaja died, eight other Palestinians were killed and five other journalists were among a thousand injured. There have been no known Israeli casualties.

The fact that Mr. Murtaja and the wounded journalists wore protective vests with signs proclaiming “PRESS” on the front has prompted suspicion that Israel deliberately targeted the journalists, as Reporters Without Borders, an activist group, and Rushdi Al Sarraj, Mr. Murtaja’s friend and sometime collaborator, have alleged. In an interview with TheNew Yorker, Mr. Al Sarraj recalled how the Israeli Army had earlier boasted that its soldiers were so precise and competent they “know where they put every bullet and where every bullet landed.”

The Israeli military has said its forces did not intentionally shoot journalists. But that assertion was undercut by Avigdor Lieberman, the Israeli defense minister, who said on Tuesday that Mr. Murtaja was a Hamas captain who had used a drone to collect intelligence on Israeli forces. That volatile charge is at odds with independent news reporting and, if it is false, could put other journalists at grave risk. Mr. Lieberman provided no proof for the claim and further demonstrated his disdain for justice, rule of law and the role of a free press by arguing on Sunday that there are “no innocent people” in Hamas-run Gaza.

An independent investigation into the killings is needed. But on March 31, after the first deaths, the United States, in support of Israel, blocked a proposed United Nations Security Council statement condemning the Israeli response, urging a transparent inquiry and affirming the right of Palestinians to demonstrate peacefully.

Such ideas should not be controversial. But ordinary Palestinians have few defenders, and much of the world has been shockingly mute about what’s happening in Gaza. Journalists have a right to work, and people have a right to demonstrate peacefully — and to assume that responsible authorities will ensure that they can do so without being shot.

Israel, a democracy with its own vigorous press and engaged citizenry, should understand that better than most.

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By The Editorial Board  of The New York Times The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

Reigning Daily With Christ – New Kingdom Church, Wuye, Abuja

Church, Facts, God, Words
JIDE OGUNSAKIN

PASTOR JIDE OGUNSAKIN Senior Pastor, New Kingdom Church, Pameec Plaza, Wuye, Abuja, Nigeria +234 806 313 4845

Thursday April, 12

PRAISE GOD WITH YOUR ALL

MEMORY VERSE:

Bless the Lord, O my soul: and all that is within me, bless his holy name (Psalms 103:1).

TEXT: Psalms 108:1-5

Until you praise God with your all you may never get His all and until you praise Him with your all you may never be made whole. Wholeness is majorly a product of praise that is why only the one leper who returned to give God praise out of the ten was made whole (Luke 17:11-19). Until you praise God spirit, soul and body your praise is not complete. David said: “Bless the Lord, O my soul: and all that is within me, bless his holy name.” By the way, are your hands within you? Then praise God with them. Are your legs within you? Then praise God with them even in a dance. Is your mouth within you? Then sing songs of praise unto Him. Everything that you have is given to you by God so use them to praise this God that has done you well. The faithfulness of God in your life is enough to attract your wholehearted praises. Don’t forget that God does fearful things in praises (Exodus 15:14). This gives us the assurance that praise is profitable. It will profit you in Jesus name. I don’t care what that challenge of your life may be, as you praise God today, God who only can do fearful things will attend to it in Jesus name.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT:

God is interested in your praise and He deserves it. Use all you’ve got to praise Him.

PRAYER:

Father, help me to give You acceptable praises today and forever.

READ THE BIBLE IN ONE YEAR

Deuteronomy 16:21-22,   17,   18   Luke 14:15-35   Psalms 44:13-26

Ease of Doing Business, 2018

Facts, international News, Politics, World Bank

Ease of Doing Business, 2018

map

1. NZ

2. Singapore

3. Denmark

6. US

7. UK

14. Australia

18. Canada

20. Germany

28. Spain

31. France

34. Japan

35. Russia

46. Italy

60. Turkey

72. Indonesia

78. China

82. S Africa

92. Saudi

100. India

124. Iran

145. Nigeria

188. Venezuela

Source: World Bank

Country Share of World Population

Facts, international News

mapShare of World Population, 2017.

China: 18.3%

India: 17.5%

US: 4.3%

Indonesia: 3.5%

Brazil: 2.7%

Pakistan: 2.7%

Nigeria: 2.6%

Bangladesh: 2.2%

Russia: 1.9%

Mexico: 1.7%

Japan: 1.7%

Ethiopia: 1.4%

Philippines: 1.4%

Vietnam: 1.3%

Egypt: 1.3%

Germany: 1.1%

Iran: 1.1%

Turkey: 1.1%